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Rational Blog: Thoughts on Golf and the World

Do you Slice your Driver?

By Gisle Solhaug |

Most golfers have a problem slicing their Driver, but not the other clubs. This would, of course, not happen if all the clubs were matched. In a matched set of clubs, all the clubs will go straight, as long as you can hit any one club straight.  So why does the Driver slice? Because the moment of inertia of the Driver is too large compared to its overall weight.  This causes the hands to be too far forward at impact. In other words, you are hitting the ball with an open face.  As your hands are too far forward at impact position they are now on a path towards the left, away from the ball, causing a slice spin.

The large moment of inertia of the modern Driver is mainly caused by the increased length of the Driver.  In an attempt by golf club manufacturers to produce more distance, they have increased the length of the Driver.  This may work for you if you are able to steer the club with your wrists into a position where you can control the ball flight.  Steering should not be necessary.  It complicates the game as you have to steer each club differently, as they are not matched.  If your clubs are properly matched they should all behave as intended with relaxed wrists.  Relaxed wrists will also provide more distance.

Golf club manufacturers are fighting the open face by manufacturing Drivers with a closed face.  However, the slice spin remains as your hands are moving right to left at impact.  Some club manufacturers try to further reduce the slice by adding movable dead weight to the club heads.  The dead weight further increases the moment of inertia of the club which again will add to the problem.  When moving the weights around on the clubhead the center of gravity of the clubhead is no longer aligned with the geometric sweet spot, causing further problems.  This all adds up to a very unstable condition.  It is like trying to balance a ball on top of another ball.

When adding weight to the grip end of the club, your hands will slow down slightly.  And due to the added weight, you body will create more kinetic energy.  This added kinetic energy translates to added club head speed.  Meaning that your club will release faster making your club head catch up with your hands.  The BioMatch method of matching golf clubs calculates the exact weight to be added to each of your clubs for the club head to catch up with your hands exactly at the point of impact. 

The BioMatch method calculates the specific weight to be added to the grip end of all your clubs.  The BioMatch system is available online at www.rational-golf.com.  The weights that are specified in the BioMatch Report can be ordered by a click of a button.  The weights are easily installed with the accompanying tool.

It is a lot easier to learn and maintain one swing rather than 13.  BioMatch does magic to any golfer´s game.

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Why Matching Golf Clubs?

By Gisle Solhaug |

There are a number of things that can go wrong in a golf swing. If the clubface is half a degree off, the ball can end up 20 meters off target. If the ball is hit 5 mm off the sweet spot, it will have a detrimental effect on distance and direction. The actions of, and timing of firing, the hundreds of muscles involved must be held in the subconscious memory of the golfer. One may think of this set of finely tuned actions as a software subroutine. Obtaining the required accuracy with one club, and embedding it in the subconscious mind, is an achievement. To create and memorize a different subroutine for each of the thirteen clubs in the bag is next to impossible. The golfer must also be able to differentiate the thirteen routines and call upon any one of them at random. With many years of endless practice, one may get close to mastering this at a subconscious level.

Even professional golfers at the highest level can win a tournament one week, and then miss the cut the following week. It is difficult to maintain the thirteen subroutines. Therefore, throughout the history of the game, people have tried to match golf clubs within a set so that they all will behave as intended, using one swing.  One subconscious subroutine could then be utilized for all thirteen clubs.  It is much easier to maintain one set of tasks rather than thirteen. Especially when they are so similar that it is difficult to tell them apart.

This discussion does not include the putter, the fourteenth club in the bag, as it uses a fundamentally different set of movement and does therefore not interfere with the subconscious skills of swinging the thirteen clubs.

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