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Rational Blog: Thoughts on Golf and the World

Thirteen Different Swings

Golfers play with 13 different full swing clubs of random Mass and Moment of Inertia.  These are the two physical properties that affect how a club behaves when swung.  Still, these two properties are ignored by the golf industry.  The subconscious mind of the golfer thereby has to learn one swing for each club.  It also has to tell them apart by waggling the club before swinging it.  To swing one club in an efficient and consistent manner is an achievement.  To learn thirteen different swings and be able to tell them apart at a subconscious level is next to impossible. 

Even if the club makers wanted to produce clubs of optimal Mass and Moment of Inertia, it would not be easy to do as the properties of each golfer comes into play as well.  The physical properties of each club would have to be optimized for each and every customer.

Brain Maps (Muscle Memory)

It gets worse; it has been found that while growing one brain map, another brain map may shrink.  This, as brain maps are competing for neurons and space (Zumerchik, 2010).   For example, by practicing with a 9-iron, the proficiency of the other 12 clubs will drop.  The only way to solve this problem is to have one brain map that covers all thirteen full swing clubs. 

BioMatch

Rational Golf LLC of Florida has solved the problem by creating an algorithm, named BioMatch, that makes a computer model of the player´s body swinging each of the clubs in the bag.  Based on input such as body mass and height and various properties of the clubs the algorithm calculates how much weight has to be added to the grip end of each club for the upper body, hands, and clubhead to be synchronized at the impact position, while the golfer applies one consistent swing.  This is how the BioMatch method of golf club matching takes the complexity out of golf.

 

Www.Rational-Golf.Com

The BioMatch method of matching golf clubs is available on www.rational-golf.com.  Any golfer or club fitter may use the site to carry out the calculations and order a tailored set of weights to be inserted into the grip end of the clubs.  The original weight of each club has to be entered on the website, so keep a kitchen scale handy.  Club fitters that have converted to the BioMatch method of matching golf clubs, and thrown away the Swingweight scale, are able to measure the moment of inertia.  For those that do not yet have access to a moment of inertia scale, the moment of inertia will be estimated based on club weight and a database of clubhead weights.

Mass Production

Rational Golf has developed a method that golf club manufacturers can implement for taking online orders and optimize the weight of each club to suit each customer in an efficient manner.

The inventor of BioMatch and founder of Rational Golf LLC, Gisle Solhaug, can be contacted on [email protected]

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